Marine Pollution: Marine Pollution Prevention Act of 2008

 

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On July 21, 2008, the President signed into law H.R. 802, the "Maritime Pollution Prevention Act of 2008." The President’s signature allowed the U.S. to become a Party to Annex VI of the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL). Under MARPOL Annex VI, which addresses vessel air pollution, large diesel-powered, ocean-going vessels such as container ships, tankers, cruise ships and bulk carriers must limit their emission of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and use cleaner-burning fuels to reduce their sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions. Annex VI Parties may also request the International Maritime Organization (the IMO) to designate marine areas within national jurisdiction as Emission Control Areas (ECA) in which more stringent emission standards will apply to both domestic and foreign-flagged vessels.  In March 2010, the IMO officially designated specific portions of U.S., Canadian, and French waters off the North American Coasts as an ECA.  (See 33 U.S.C. 1901(a) (4) & (5), 1902(a)(1 ) & (5), and 1907 (a), as amended by the Maritime Pollution Prevention Act of 2008 (MPPA), Pub. L. 110-280, 122 Stat 2611).

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Last updated March 2017